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Month: October 2016

Setting up a CNC Mill and Lathe Part 2

I didn’t write a post for it, but I did the CNC conversion on the Mill and Lathe about a month back, and for the most part, it went well. This weekend, I finally had enough spare time to get back to working on getting it actually up and running. I’ve somewhat trammed the machine and gotten rid of most of the backlash, but will need to do a bit more work on that before working on real parts — The big “fun” thing I did was get some g-code running on the mill, and do some practice engravings with a sharpie and some paper. Things are working pretty well, and there’s definitely something cathartic about the sound of the steppers working through circular profiles. (Even if the knobs on the handwheels are rattling somewhat. I’ll need to tape those down)

eCam Engraving Test
eCam Engraving Test

For a CAM program, I’ve been looking for something that can handle non-trivial profiles on the lathe, so that I can use it to machine the profiles of the AUV’s Kort nozzle and nose-cone. Affordable lathe CAM programs are hard to find, but one that has piqued my curiosity is eCam — I’m playing around with the trial version right now, and it seems to be working well for my uses so I think I’ll shell out and purchase a copy once I’ve confirmed it can output effectively to LinuxCNC for some specific uses cases I have. It’s definitely in the lower price range for CAM software, at least for hobby usage.

Some minor modifications to eCam’s post-processor were needed for the basic engraving routine:

  • Update the “Head New Program” section by removing the line “O{PRG_NUM}({PRG_NAME})” and splitting the line “G0G28G91Z0” into three unique lines, one for each G code command. (LinuxCNC doesn’t support multiple G-code commands with a coordinate in a single line. Multiple G-code commands without coordinates appear to be fine)
  • Disable incremental moves.
CNC Testing, "Engraving" With a Sharpie.
CNC Testing, “Engraving” With a Sharpie.

Loading up the code was pretty painless, and the milling machine is working well so far! The lathe tests are showing I need to do a bit more work on the postprocessor to get it to play nicely with LinuxCNC, but it doesn’t look like it will be too onerous.

I’ll try to get some materials soon, after which if all goes well I can start working on some of the AUV’s structural components.

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Doppler Velocity Log Acoustic Windows

Although I haven’t posted anything in the past month, I have been working away at the AUV here and there between work and some much-needed vacation. I’m making some decent progress in design and setting up for manufacture. A couple of the big things I’m working on are some detailed design work on an acoustic modem, and putting some finishing touches on my CNC machines to start building some of the mechanical components for this project. I’ll post an update on those topics when I have some more substantial progress.

In the meantime, I was digging for some files and came across some earlier CFD results, specifically pertaining to the Doppler Velocity Log (DVL) and the flow of water around it. A DVL works by sending sonar pulses out at multiple off-nadir angles and measuring the doppler shift in the return signal. If the AUV is stationary, there is no Doppler shift, but if there is motion a Doppler shift is induced which can be measured to determine the motion of the AUV underwater in lieu of not being able to get a GPS lock.

Water flow around the DVL Pockets.
Water flow around the DVL Pockets.

Due to the relatively small diameter of the AUV, and the size of the DVL transducers, they needed to be pocketed in the hull. I ran some simulations to determine the way water would flow, and as expected there is some recirculation induced by the pockets. This not only adds drag but potentially increases flow noise on the transducer itself.

As such, I’ve modified the design slightly and will attempt to put a LDPE window to hopefully improve the flow. LDPE is a type of plastic which has an acoustic impedance fairly close to water, so should be mostly transparent to the sonar wave. Modeling the shape proved an interesting challenge, but haveing done so will enable to me to fairly easily cut out the shape from flat sheet using the CNC.

DVL Acoustic Windows (Bottom left transducer cavity exposed)
DVL Acoustic Windows (Bottom left transducer cavity exposed)

Hopefully, some more updates will be forthcoming in the next couple of weeks!

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