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Rudder Simulations

While designing the thrust/steering module for the AUV, I figured I should determine how much torque the rudder will require (for motor selection) and what forces it will result (for eventual control development). The rudder itself is a fairly simple plane with an airfoil type profile, with the rotational axis a quarter of the way from the front to the rear, making it what’s known as a balanced rudder. More on this later.

Balanced Rudder

I set up an Open Foam case to calculate the forces and torque, and made a script to run it through 0 to 50-degree steering in 5-degree increments. I opted to just use an isolated rudder for the initial tests, although in reality there will be interaction between the body and the rudder, especially since the rudders will be located in the region where flow is beginning to separate from the AUV hull. Note that in earlier CAD models, I had shown the rudder being only a portion of a fin — in order to simplify things, and balance the rudder, I opted to make the rudder consist of the entire fin.

The simulated results I got are shown in the chart below. I only ran simulations up to 2 m/s, as I don’t expect the AUV to go much faster than that operationally.

Rudder torque vs deflection angle, with rudder rotational axis 25% back from leading edge of mean chord

Although there appears to be an outlier at 30 degrees deflection (Either due to some real hydrodynamic effect or errors in the simulation), this result is actually what’s expected for a balanced (or partially balanced) rudder. If the rotational axis was at the front edge of the rudder, all the forces would be acting on one side of the rotational axis which would result in significant torque requirements to move the rudder. By locating the pivot point near the rudder foil’s center of pressure, the forces in front of and behind the rotational axis negate each other resulting in reduced torque requirements.

With the balanced rudder, the forces start off minimal while the flow is laminar. Once the rudder’s foil begins to stall, the torque will actually invert and go the other direction. To illustrate this, some renderings of the results from Open Foam are shown below. Note that the streamline colours represent particle velocity, but the colour scales are slightly different between all images.

 

10-Degree deflection. Flow is laminar.

In the first case above, with 10 degrees deflection, the flow is still smooth around the rudder’s foil. While the torque value at this point is very low (hence why it’s “balanced”), using the right-hand rule to interpret the torque around the Z-axis, it appears that the torque is actually wanting the rudder to keep deflecting!

20-Degree deflection. Flow is starting to separate.

At 20-degrees separation, per the plotted results, the rudder foil is around the stall point. At this point, the torque around the rotational axis is neutral. Any further deflection wants to push the rudder back towards the forward position.

40-Degree deflection. The rudder is stalled. Note the turbulence behind.

Throwing the rudder even further, to 40-degrees, we can see that it’s now clearly stalled. You can see the turbulent flow behind the rudder. The streamlines make for a really cool graphic!

For curiosity’s sake, I ran a couple of extra simulations, varying the location of the rudder’s pivot axis 4mm forward and 4mm back from the 1/4 chord position (this turned out to be 6.6% of the mean chord). A plot of the results below. I still have some optimization to do in terms of rudder profile and mounting point, but these give me a good order of magnitude understanding of the rudder torque for initial design work.

Varying the location of the rudder’s rotational axis effects the torque.

In terms of motors to drive the rudders, I’m currently planning a geared down brushless motors, as I want to have fairly fine and smooth control over the mechanism (reduce noise, vibrations, improve fine control over hobby servos).

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