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A Lesson in Rigidity

After getting some metal stock this week, I was anxiously waiting for the weekend so I could start machining some prototypes for the AUV’s universal ring bulkheads.

Now, I need to throw out a disclaimer — I’m not an expert machinist by any stretch of the imagination. In fact, quite the opposite and I’m learning as I go, which is what this post is all about.

Having read through different things on feeds and speeds, I set up some programs with what I thought were somewhat aggressive cuts (for the Sherline) that I hoped the machine could handle — 1mm depth with a 3/8″ end mill into 6061 aluminum, with a feed of about 260 mm/minute. I’d read complaints about the rigidity of the 2000 series mill, but figured I’d try anyways.

The intent was to mill out the center of a 6″ diameter piece of Aluminum, so I could use the 3.1″ Sherline chuck to clamp from the inside onto the lathe for all the turning operations I’d need to do. I was hoping to salvage the inside chunk, since the stock wasn’t cheap. I planned on accomplishing this by milling in half way from one side, then flipping the part and milling in from the other side.

Now, the Sherline motor handled the first cuts like a champ. The 2000 series vertical column? Not so much. Unfortunately, as the machine went through the cuts, it put enough stress on the vertical column causing it to pivot along the vertical axis and throwing it off center. You can see the steps caused by this in the picture below, due to the column gradually pivoting at each cut, throwing off the alignment more and more. Luckily this was a roughing cut, so the the stock wasn’t lost.

Stepped profile caused by the wandering alignment of the mill's vertical column
Stepped profile caused by the wandering alignment of the mill’s vertical column

Eventually, I tightened the column well enough that it finished the last cuts without too much added deflection. Figuring I could tighten up the mill just a little bit more before flipping the part and trying the other side, I put the wrench on again, applied some torque and snapped the bolt clean off, leaving me with a Z-axis no longer attached to my mill, and the mill out of commission!

Not to be deterred, I figured I would try and see how well the the part fit in the lathe’s chuck using the pocket that was milled in one side. Not too bad, I must say:

6" diameter part on a 3,1" diameter chuck
6″ diameter part on a 3,1″ diameter chuck

I then screwed the chuck inot the lathe. I had to use two riser blocks to get clearance on the large part, causing some inappropriate cutter geometry. I needed that much offset to get the part below 6″ diameter, after which the intent is to only use a single riser block, and some special tool holders I’m planning to make in order to hold tools perpendicular to the part.

Turning large diameter parts
Turning large diameter parts

Turning the large diameter part was easier than I’d thought I used 0.2mm depth of cut and a 60 mm/min feed rate, which the machine handled well. The part stayed solidly affixed to the chuck, even when I accidentally crashed the tool into the part.

Now that I’ve gotten the stock cut such that I can mount it on the lathe, and turn it freely on the lathe, hopefully soon I’ll be able to start working it to the final shape. Unfortunately, I ran out of time to machine today and had to start cleaning up at this point.

Next steps, I’ll have to fix the mill. From what I’ve read online, the rigid column Sherlines fare much, much better than the fancy articulating column mills, and luckily the part to do the conversion is fairly inexpensive. Although perhaps the Sherline isn’t the right tool for machining large parts en-masse, for the quantities of parts I need and considering it’s what I already had available, it looks like it’ll fit my needs just fine.

2 Comments

  1. Charles Rioux
    Charles Rioux January 6, 2017

    Hello,

    I have about the same setup. have a 4 inch diameter aluminum stock that I need to do exactly what you did to attach the 3.1 inch chuck for my Sherline lathe. I will use a rotary table with the 5 inch tooling plate. Now it’s finding the dead center that is somehow complicated. How did you work on yours? I see on the pictures that you drilled a hole that wasn’t the center but the other look’s perfect. I know that brute stock is really not a perfect circle that will be fixed on the lathe… I’m also not a machinist and learning on the way; my project is to make my audio turn table 😉

    Thanks!

    • Roger
      Roger January 7, 2017

      Hi Charles,

      For the roughing setup in this post, I only very coarsely centered, by drawing some lines on the stock to find the center and eyeballing it. That was good enough for these purposes, as the stock was large enough that I could turn it down to the correct diameter. I was actually a couple of millimeters out but wasn’t too concerned about that tolerance for roughing.

      For more precise centering, ideally you’d want to use a coaxial indicator, but those can be pricey. What I’ve done for accurate centering on the mill with good results is mounting a dial indicator in an arm, which was then mounted onto the spindle – slowly spinning that around the outside of a round piece, you can get measurements in the X and Y axis to accurately center the piece.

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