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Setting up a CNC Mill and Lathe Part 2

I didn’t write a post for it, but I did the CNC conversion on the Mill and Lathe about a month back, and for the most part, it went well. This weekend, I finally had enough spare time to get back to working on getting it actually up and running. I’ve somewhat trammed the machine and gotten rid of most of the backlash, but will need to do a bit more work on that before working on real parts — The big “fun” thing I did was get some g-code running on the mill, and do some practice engravings with a sharpie and some paper. Things are working pretty well, and there’s definitely something cathartic about the sound of the steppers working through circular profiles. (Even if the knobs on the handwheels are rattling somewhat. I’ll need to tape those down)

eCam Engraving Test
eCam Engraving Test

For a CAM program, I’ve been looking for something that can handle non-trivial profiles on the lathe, so that I can use it to machine the profiles of the AUV’s Kort nozzle and nose-cone. Affordable lathe CAM programs are hard to find, but one that has piqued my curiosity is eCam — I’m playing around with the trial version right now, and it seems to be working well for my uses so I think I’ll shell out and purchase a copy once I’ve confirmed it can output effectively to LinuxCNC for some specific uses cases I have. It’s definitely in the lower price range for CAM software, at least for hobby usage.

Some minor modifications to eCam’s post-processor were needed for the basic engraving routine:

  • Update the “Head New Program” section by removing the line “O{PRG_NUM}({PRG_NAME})” and splitting the line “G0G28G91Z0” into three unique lines, one for each G code command. (LinuxCNC doesn’t support multiple G-code commands with a coordinate in a single line. Multiple G-code commands without coordinates appear to be fine)
  • Disable incremental moves.
CNC Testing, "Engraving" With a Sharpie.
CNC Testing, “Engraving” With a Sharpie.

Loading up the code was pretty painless, and the milling machine is working well so far! The lathe tests are showing I need to do a bit more work on the postprocessor to get it to play nicely with LinuxCNC, but it doesn’t look like it will be too onerous.

I’ll try to get some materials soon, after which if all goes well I can start working on some of the AUV’s structural components.

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